Fine dining, Futurist-style

I can’t resist – another excerpt from John Dickie’s history of Italian cuisine, “Delizia!” (see here for the first).

The Taverna del Santopalato was opened in 1931, following the publication of the Manifesto of Futurist Cooking, which aimed, among other things, to abolish pasta. “For the Futurists, pasta was ‘Italy’s absurd gastronomic religion’. It was too weighty and bulky for the speed and dynamism of modern life”.

One of the plates was a proto-Heston Blumenthal multisensory extravaganza called “Aerovictuals: Black olives, fennel hearts and candied bitter orange (on a single plate set down to the diner’s right). Sandpaper, red silk and black velvet (on a rectangular pad to the diner’s left). Wagner (issuing from hidden speakers). Each customer was instructed to bring the food directly to his or her mouth with one hand, while repeatedly stroking the rectangluar pad with the other and having perfume applied to the back of the neck by the head waiter.”

See this article for more details of the wacky dishes.

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5 thoughts on “Fine dining, Futurist-style

  1. J August 6, 2009 / 4:26 am

    How about they feed me spaghetti and meatballs, whilst massaging my shoulders and neck, with classic Bowie being played by hidden speakers?

    Like

  2. Di August 9, 2009 / 10:37 pm

    I don’t think I would like that very much however I would love to photograph Little C’s face if they even dared try that on her … 🙂

    Like

  3. fooddesigner September 17, 2009 / 1:56 am

    It’s not far off from the ‘haute cuisine’ of today. Molecular gastronomy subjects you to all kinds of ‘food experiences’ nowadays. Marinetti’s idea’s are not short of the mark. Smelling flowers, utilizing ipods with specific music to illicit certain emotions whilst eating a dish. Bring on the Marinetti dishes!

    Like

    • simonlitton September 17, 2009 / 9:41 am

      I loved the Marinetti-style dishes at The Fat Duck, although I can’t imagine EVERY meal being served in this way.

      Like

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