Isola Bella and Villa Crespi

Last week we found ourselves, child free, driving around the lakes of Piedmont. The kids were with their grandparents and we found a car rental company which would let us have a small vehicle for the entirely reasonable sum of €19 for two days. We sped up to Lago Maggiore to have a bit of a look around.

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The weather was fine, and on the spur of the moment we took a ferry into the lake to visit Isola Bella. Apart from a tiny village (full of restaurants and souvenir shops) by the harbour where the ferry docked, this small island is taken up almost entirely by a large stately home and the attached gardens. I had little interest in the palazzo, but we had to walk through it in order to access the gardens, so we found ourselves slaloming our way around groups of trudging tourists as they gazed at a large collection of uninspiring paintings in overwrought gilt frames, spread across a ridiculous number of drawing and function rooms.

The route was long and winding with no possibility of short-cuts, but eventually we found ourselves back out in the fresh air and entered the gardens. These were the most intriguing aspect when seen from the water as we approached:

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Here’s the view of the other side:

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And looking back towards the mainland.

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See that lacy white thing on the lawn on the right hand side?

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Albino peacock!

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In fact there were two, one on each of the twin lawns. And they regularly called to each other and put on displays for the smartphone-wielding tourists.

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Our lodgings (and, er, dinings) for that night were a short drive away next to Lake Orta. You may remember that we’d been to this area before a few years ago, and in fact we had driven past and noted Villa Crespi as an intriguing-looking place. So of course this was our destination this time. As the hotel website tells it, “Cristoforo Benigno Crespi, a pioneer of the Italian cotton industry, while travelling on business in the Middle East was bewitched by Baghdad and its charms and in 1879 finished his own magnificent Moorish villa”. This is the view of the tower from the terrace outside our room.

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The elaborate stucco work continues inside:

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And the view from our room towards the lake wasn’t bad either.

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After a bit of relaxation we headed down for dinner. Chef Antonino Cannavacciuolo is originally from Naples. Hence the title of the tasting menu: “Itinerary from the south to the north of Italy”.

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The opening selection of amuse-bouches.

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I didn’t take notes, but I recall that the round buns at the top were focaccia (my wife’s only complaint of the evening was about this inauthentic version of her home town’s speciality), the green blobs at the bottom were crackers with gorgonzola and celery, and the macaroons at left were savoury.

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First course: oyster in a creamy radish sauce. I’ll never be enthusiastic about oyster but this slipped down easily enough, aided by the sauce.

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Raw shrimp in a “pizza”-style sauce (tomato, mozzarella, oregano). Strange and memorable.

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Linguine with squid and a rye bread sauce.

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Red mullet, aubergine, and a smoked provola cheese sauce. Fantastic. This dish was one of the motivations for buying the chef’s recipe book before we left the next day.

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Pigeon with foie gras and chocolate crunchy bits. My son was incredulous when I told him I’d eaten this bird, and asked me “Did they clean out all the poo first?”

It was a surprisingly large amount of meat and we started to feel full at this point.

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But then…CHEESE TROLLEY! A good range, although the waiter didn’t give us too much time to find out what each one was, and just gave us a selection.

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Pre-dessert was an alcoholic sorbet to be sucked up through a straw from inside an edible white chocolate cup.

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Ice cream and fruit.

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More nibbles. We were really full at this point and didn’t finish them all.

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Pretty, though.

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After this there was also a couple of sfogliatelle, but we really couldn’t manage those so we asked for them to be sent to our room and we had them the next morning.

Oh, there was also some good wine.

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But in spite of our bursting bellies it had been a very enjoyable meal. One of the best for a while, in fact.

At breakfast the next morning I saw mention on the menu of cereals, but couldn’t find them anywhere. Only after I’d had my fill of bread and cheese did I notice the small jars on the buffet which, on closer inspection, were revealed as bespoke cereal containers. Rice Crespis!

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I can see us coming back here in the not too distant future.